Define your generation here. Generation What
Dar al-Ifta calls for code of honor regulating social media use

In a report issued on Saturday, Dar al-Ifta, Egypt’s official religious institution tasked with drafting edicts, proposed the drafting of a code of honor imposing “religious conditions” for users of social media to abide by.

The report said that the code of honor would aim to protect the youth from “the cultural invasion” that opposes Islamic principles.

In its report, Dar al-Ifta warned of the increase of what it calls “pictures and videos that oppose social norms and religious rules.” As it is impossible to ban the use of social media, the report continues, a code of honor is necessary.

Dar al-Ifta suggests that the code of honor should preserve five aspects, as dictated in Islam: religion, self, reputation, money and mind.

The report says that social media interactions have to abide by moral, social, cultural and religious rules, prioritizing truthfulness in sharing information and respect of copyrights and privacy. The report also calls for “the protection of society from harmful and polluted information.”

The report adds that social media interactions have to observe the rule of religion and cultural norms “in a way that makes social media users true to their origins and guarantees the protection of youth from bizarre and imported behavior and from the cultural invasion that opposes our Islamic culture.”

The report also warned of the dangers of the  “uncontrolled exposure” that the youth get through social media

Dar al-Ifta has released edicts before relating to social media, including one that dictated that spreading rumors and exchanging insults on social media is prohibited in Islam.

The report does not give details on how to implement said code of honor or how it should be applied for people of other faiths. 

AD